Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32
through the case of marcello a 37-year-old ecuadorian immigrant who was beaten to death by a group of teenagers on long island in 2008. this is about 25 minutes. >> i feel like i'm in my living room having a conversation. i am really very glad that you were here tonight. i almost didn't make it, but that is another story. as many of you know, my book "hunting season" is about a horrible crime that took place november 8, 2008 in long island when a group of teenagers attacked and killed an immigrant from ecuador. his name was marcello. he wasn't alone that night. he was walking with his friend who survived the attack but marcelo did not. there were many reasons i was a track to the story. one of them was the nature of the crime. i found out very early on that these young people coming and cy were very young. they went to entertainment to go around hunting for beaners which is what they call immigrants. for some of the undocumented immigrants from mexico in the profession they kept talking about how they were looking for illegals from mexico. so, i was horrified by that, of course as
and killed an immigrant from ecuador. he was not alone that night, walking with his best friend, and he survived the the attack, but the other did not. there were many reasons why i was attracted to the story. one of themfuls the nature of the crime. i found out early on that this young people, and they were very young, they were 17 and 18 at the time, juniors and seniors in high school, made it a practice, sport if you will, or entertainment to go around hunting for beaners, which is what they call immigrants. for somebody on that immigrated from mexico. they talk about how they were looking for illegals from mexico. so i was horrified by that, of course, as anybody would be, the fact that young people think so little of human life as to go out hunting for people as they were preyed. i wrote a story about study, two sociologists released from university, state university of albany, in which they said immigrants where no longer going to the city. they were, in fact, bypassing the cities and moving to suburb suburbia. that was happening all over the country, not just with hispanic immigr
under obamacare. likewise on the immigration context of a case-by-case prosecutorial discretion is one thing but if they get policy that will apply to 1.8 million people, that is quite something different. this is a scale of decision-making that isn't in the traditional conception of the prosecutorial discretion. >> the president has taken it a step further and has actually given legal documents to the people in that circumstance well beyond simply deciding not to leave them there and not prosecute them but actually enable the violation by giving them documents to help them avoid the problems from the country that they are not present. >> [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] the chair now recognizes the ranking member. >> [inaudible] with the witness to his left and i would like to ask if he could pick up that line of discussion. we are pleased that you are here because there has been so much excitement or excited rhetoric about where president an the prd his administration are going. i've never heard of this level of hypothesizing where this is all going to take us and i think it is co
of the administration's decision to delay the employer mandate in health care law and various decisions on immigration and drug law. virginia republican bob goodlatte chairs the committee. we will have live coverage when they start. just a couple of news items on the industry should secretary of state, john kerry is in brussels. he's joining the diplomats around the world in hopes of persuading afghan manners to let troops remain in afghanistan beyond 2014, hamid karzai had signing the status of forces agreement. in washington, "the associated press" that the consumer finance watchdog is expanding its oversight of sallie mae and other companies. a rule issued today by the consumer financial protection bureau extends that agencies supervision to non-companies that have lenders. the cfp be overseas banks and service student loans, but most of the end from the white house, president obama will focus on the benefits of the health care law he will be flying by the white house says have benefited from the overhaul. he will remind american fork discrimination against those with preexisting conditions. we'll
the president's actions do not enforce deportation against a certain classes of immigrants. you know, instead of complaining about that, this committee could hold a markup and report of a comprehensive immigration reform bill, send it to the for -- >> mr. lazarus, you are -- not you but the question is too inept minutes over. so you can do this by giving us advice of what our legislative agenda should lock like an answer the question, i would be grateful to you. >> that is an answer. i think on this has a lot of power and it should use it. >> and i assume that the failure to exercise is also an exercise of power. the failure to act. mr. cannon, would you like to briefly -- >> maybe mr. lazarus knows better than i do how many bombs the president has dropped before that becomes more. i don't know the actual number. but i think what mr. king was getting at is, there is one last thing to which the people can resort to the government does not respect the restraints the constitution places on the cover. abraham lincoln talks about our right to alter our government or our revolution right to overthr
a woman, i'm an immigrant, i'm hispanic. i don't qualify for aarp membership yet. and i am a republican. sadly, i'm an endangered species right now. and i often get asked how can you possibly be a republican? why are you a republican? the explanation lies in my personal history. my family's story is what shaped my political views. i came here in 1980. i was born in nicaragua. there was a communist revolution, the sandinistas came to power in 1979 after a three-year, bloody civil war. it turned out the sandinistas were also communists. by the way, i don't know if you know a sandinista got elected mayor in new york, and they quickly went about instituting communism in our little country. my parents were not fans of redistribution of wealth, and at that point they made the decision of getting out of nicaragua. my father stayed behind, he became a contra, a freedom fighter. and when your father's a guerrilla struggling to bring freedom back the your country, you realize at an early age that politics matter. election results matter. being a bystander is not an option. being involved is what
before the attack on marcelo, they attacked another immigrant who was a naturalized u.s. citizen from columbia who have been here for more than 30 years, hector. he was working in a restaurant and was walking home and they attacked him. he ran to a house called the lights went on and he was saved. they went on and be found and killed the lucero. no one asked him where are you from, what language do you speak. it was just based on appearance. it's a very, very complicated thing and very scary issue. but i think i'm going to stop. i am all talked out. thank you so much and we can keep this conversation going. thanks so much for being here. [applause] >>> here's a look at some of the best-selling nonfiction books according to "the wall street journal." this reflects sales as of november 17. >>> the author you may not have heard of but you might have seen his work is kevin kallaugher, the editorial cartoonist for the economist. how did you come up with the idea of putting all of your work into a book? >> this year celebrated my 35th year with the economist magazine. i thought this would b
plated of america the beautiful and the immigration officer said it will she was not what it is which is the star spangled banner, but i'm afraid that's one wrong. you've only got nine more chances. a distinct possibility vimy denied permission. and then was one man. complicated story helicon about. they have not talked to people to take the oath on the after deck of the u.s.s. constitution which is this wonderful sailing vessel, the oldest commission water should actually in the world. nelson's victory. but this one does. so the of was performed on independence day 2011 during a hot day. it was just magical an incredibly moving paid have to say. i've never seen an immigration ceremony, all people who suddenly were free to do with their waste. and they can vote. they had no fear of arrest. all of it. it was wonderful. the judges on the end was as remarkable woman who has now become a great personal friend. i have lunch with her. she is called marion bolar. she was the judge at the moment in charge of the boston america to the boston marathon bombing case. when that yemen will cut she
with a couple of sisters and my great-grandfather was german immigrants a and ohio state's 1926 even back then to be overwhelmed of the corporation's. and also one more thing, my father was part of that cycle of american history of the conservative serious locally every 30 years so he picked up the historical academic structures from my grandpa. >> they're all from the midwest so there was the therapy they brought to the east. debt was genetic civic given the current political climate but in the postwar years a strong conservative current of mccarthy of ohio. because they were witness there was the entirely different climate it did 15 seconds i will give a very remote part of south dakota that build a hydroelectric dam in the middle of nowhere at a store their expensive paid very good wages and change the lives of everybody who went through their. now coming back as doctors and engineers. of those courageous with the importance to get out and touch and feel what of those accounts that arthur gives it his accounts and was the side of the south. in the old lady it to be called to the egghea
on a number of issues. just to name a few, the fiscal year 2014 budget. the farm bill, and immigration reform. reaching across the aisle has become more and more difficult, and principled compromise seems like a mountain too tall to climb. this morning i have the honor of introducing to national leaders who can hopefully help shed some light on how our legislative colleagues in washington, d.c., and the white house, might be able to come together and find solutions to our nation's critical problems. let me begin with governor huntsman. he began his public service as a staff assistant to ronald reagan. he has since served for u.s. presidents in critical roles, including u.s. ambassador to singapore, deputy assistant secretary of commerce for asia, u.s. trade ambassador come and most recently u.s. ambassador to china. twice elected as utah's governor, he brought about strong economic reform, tripled the states rainy day fund, and helped bring unemployment rates to historic lows. during his tenure, utah was named the best managed state in america and the best state in which to do business. he al
of the ins if you chose to ignore pat on an immigration issue you do it on your own. the senator does a lot of things that are below the radar screen that make a big difference in the lives of other people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. he is not a show horse. he is a work horse. he has been a long time leader in the international campaign against landmi mines. he authored a bill to ban the export of these horrible weapons and spearheaded the effort to aid victims of land minds by creating a special fund and that fund has now on annual bases provide $12 million in aid to the vaccinaictims of these bomb. he sponsored the patrick leahy law and that prohibits the department of state and defense to provide military aid to foreign military and police forces that engage and violate human rights. and he never stops leading on an issue central to our mission at human rights first and that is refuge protection. and the act he sponsors elimina eliminates them from not having safe places to go. in 2009, he called for the creation of an independent investigation for torture after 9-11. he
fellow where he focuses on immigration policy and border control and security initiatives. as a board member we have been incredibly blessed with his expertise that have been invaluable to navigate complex political challenges. please join me to welcome jim ziegler. >> 84 that kind and generous introduction is a particular pleasure to introduce our keynote speaker. patrick leahy for -- patrick leahy from the great state of vermont. it is my pleasure because i consider him to be a good friend and for all of you out there it is possible for republicans or democrats to be friends in washington today. it is not easy but it is possible but a special honor because he is a real honest to goodness champion of the causes human rights for everyone everywhere. without reservation there is no greater champion of human rights of the u.s. congress and our friend patrick leahy. he is determined with his heroic work to the advance human rights is too extensive in detail to give him a chance to talk but with two or three of his large accomplishments but before i do that i want to mention i had an oppo
was a german immigrant, and they just -- and there's an interesting speech that my grandfather gave at ohio state in 1926 where he said even back hen in 1926 he said -- then in 1926 we're being overwhelmed by uniformity. you know, the corporations and the banks and everything like that, they're trying to squeeze the heart out of you. and this was -- and also my -- i was going to say one more thing and that's my father's theory of the cycles of of american history, that you have liberal periods followed by conservative periods roughly every 30 years, that was my grandfather's theory. and so he picked up a lot of his, even his historical academic structures from my grandfather. >> stephen? >> both our relatives on my mother's side and my father's side were all from the midwest, so there was a kind of prairie populism that they brought to the east when we were growing up. and it was genetic. it was almost, you know -- >> part of the thing, jon, that's important especially given the current political climate in which we're so sliced and diced in so many ways that, in fact, in the post-war years
to the bad old days i meant that you to kill me to do it. the son of a russian immigrant happened to be seated by me at dinner this summer when i went to dinner with a bunch of our friends. he looked at me as that, did you like yeltsin? he said it just like that. yeah, i did. he got a big smile and said good. my country and its entire history is only produced to true democrats. alexander kareem key and then in linden got rid of kerensky and you've help yeltsin stay. too bad we lost it again, that maybe we can get it back. incredible conversation. suresh of us going broke like crazy at the end of the civil war. the first thing i did was to go to vancouver and put together a $24 billion package so we could bring soldiers home from other countries. principally the politics states. we were talking about this before. the american people were 74% against russia. what is bill clinton going to canada to meet with the russian leader? we've got economic problems at home. and i also knew i needed his cooperation to keep from coming up the works in bosnia because of the historic ties of the r
on an immigration issue, you do it at your own peril. i can tell you senator leahy does a lot of things that are below the radar screen that make a big difference in the lives of a lot of people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. he is not a show horse. he is a workhorse. pat leahy has been a longtime leader in the international campaign against land mines. in fact, in 1992, he offered the first bill of any government anywhere to be in the export of these very horrible weapons. in fact, he spearheaded the effort in congress to aid victims of landmines by creating a special fund known as the leahy war victims fund and that fund has now, an annual basis provides about $12 million of aid to victims of these horrible bombs. in 1897, senator leahy sponsored historic legislation appropriately known as the leahy law, which prohibits the u.s. department of state department of state and department of defense from providing military aid to foreign military and police forces and engage them byerly human rights. and he never stopped bleeding on an issue central to our mission at human rig
about social justice struggles in the united states, on immigration issues, and i said i want to be a part of that. some of the young folks who might be familiar with the terms i'm about to use, but i used a pen and what was called paper, and i wrote her something we used to call a letter and put it inside of what's called an envelope, and i licked this thing called a stamp -- anyway,. [laughter] i want to do anything for you if i can. if you have a dog, i'll walk your dog or feed your camp. and then i started going to events. she never responded. i was stalk her, basically, not in a creepy way, and i think she had to decide whether to get a restraining order or let me volunteer. so she let me volunteer, and i learned journalism as a trade. real reporters would ask me to help them edit their pieces, so i learned by p watching journalists who i really admired engage in the trade. and once i started going international, going places like iraq, a fire just caught inside of me, and i wanted to tell the stories of people who had no voice. >> host: jeremy scahill is the author of "b
. the son of a russian immigrant happened to be seated by me at dinner this summer when hillary and i went to dinner with the bunch of our friends and he looked at me and said the you like boris yeltsin? yes, i did. he got a big smile, good. he said my country in its entire history has only produced two true democrats, alexander karen ski and boris yeltsin and listen got yeltsin to stay. too bad we lost it again but maybe we can get it back. an incredible conversation. russia was going broke. the first thing i did was go to vancouver and meet with boris yeltsin and put together a package to bring soldiers home from other countries. talking about this before the american people were 74% against the package, what is bill clinton going to do to meet with the russian leader? we got economic problems at home. i also knew i needed his cooperation to keep from gumming up the works in bosnia because of the historic ties of the russians to the serbs. so we did that. you heard all this before, but america was basically supposed to stop this awful violence in bosnia. miraculously acting on its own in
immigration sooner or later if you. -- if you want your economy to continue growing, and that immigration will probably come naturally from the whrat tin america, a political dividend here, and there's a tremendous opportunity for the u.s. in latin america. of course, china is always very interested in latin america's energy resources, in our water, in our biodiversity, and if they want to invest, latin america will welcome it. so be it. >> thank you. we are almost out of time, but before asking one last question, a couple housekeeping matters. we have our upcoming speakers. december 10, we have the honorable anna parker, mayor of houston, texas, dan acerson, chairman and ceo of general motors, and on december 19th, skaggs, bluegrass ledge. second, i want to present the guest with a press club coffee mug to be filled with colombia coffee. [laughter] >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] and -- [applause] and for the time question, you mentioned the property pegs, 5 enthe u.s. team is looking for a change. how do you see the prospects in the world cup? >> well, i told president obama this
or monetary policy through the common central date to trade immigration and each division in the soviet republic would have their own police forces then we had to sell it with a peacekeeping force of 60,000 two-thirds of which would be supplied by one-third of the united states. you heard them talk about that. if i remember of the 60 percent of the people were opposed. i say that to make this point. the american people particularly when they think things about well at home. how political leaders often times popular not exactly like the voters still you not to do it it is like a blinking yellow light tell us what our objectives are intel is what it will cost. a and you better me right. if not you own a. that is basically what the polls made cannot make foreign policy decisions decisions, you just cannot do it. 80% of the people were against me helping mexico when we gave them a loan in 1995. in we had just lost congress. people thought i was nuts. thinking of bosnia we don't make the loan to mexico and they hate us and so does latin america and then the next year we have another 1 millio
the cooperation between the two areas and you are going to need immigration sooner or later if you want your economy to continue growing and that immigration will come naturally from latin america. that even has a political dividend here so there is a tremendous opportunity for the u.s. in latin america. of course china is very interested in latin america's energy resources, and our water, in our biodiversity and if they want to invest latin america will welcome it. >> thank you. we are almost out of time but for asking one more question couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all i would like to remind you of our upcoming speakers. on december 10 we have the honorable mayor of houston texas. on december 16th 16th dan nickerson chairman and ceo of general motors and on december 19, ricky skaggs grammy award-winning and bluegrass legend. second i would like to present our guest with the traditional national press club coffee mug full fleet to be filled with colombian coffee. [applause] and for the final question you mentioned the good prospects of colombia's national team. th
to say in congress, and is comprehensive immigration reform. i mean, if you look at what the senate did, there's a path of their that a lot of people compromise on to create a path to citizenship, plus ways of making sure that we take people out of the shadows, we grow our economy and would make sure that our borders are secure. and so first and foremost, the house of representatives needs to focus on that. and i was part of the faster families yesterday. i have been arrested on the whole process of trying to get the immigration form and whatnot. in terms of education, this is an issue. pre-k is an issue about showing whether results actually really matter and whether research actually matters, or whether the congress lives in an evidence results. we have seen -- i mean, pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually had a bipartisan bill that aligns -- the house of representatives in the senate, a miller-harkin bill that actually has two republicans from new york state. i give them huge props for being
is illegal immigrant. wire is the narrative that illegal immigration is bad score we should pay attention the last thing the operatives out of washington want is hispanic in the black faction so the case is buried if george zimmerman had been named jorge you never would have heard the case. never. but in any case. it is amazing. it took 40 minutes for cbs to approve the green light to do the show to bring on the parent of trayvon martin to do the show. they bring them on the show then i will use the word one is optics the optics of this case they need to make the case for trayvon. i don't the gripes of parents there sorrow and grief and anger even if it is displaced. but i do blame the people who are manipulating. but the real tragedy of his life was his family history. because when he was three his father left his mother. for the next 12 years he was raised largely by his stepmother who was totally out of the narrative. trayvon martin's father is a truck driver his mother is a college graduate making good money and very presentable people. they are formidable. they pay attention. but the
you is commissioner of the ins, if you choose to ignore pat leahy on its immigration issue, you do it at your peril. senator leahy does a lot of things that are below are screamed that make a good difference in the lives of a lot of people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. she is not a show horse. he is a workhorse. pat leahy has been a long-time leader in the international campaign against land mines. in fact, in 1992, he offered the first bill of any government anywhere to be on the export of these very horrible weapons. in fact come he spearheaded the effort in congress to aid the guns of landmine by creating a special fund known as the leahy were picked and signed. that fund has now on an annual basis provide about $12 million of aid to the victims of these horrible bombs. in 1997, senator leahy sponsored historic legislation appropriately known as the leahy law, which prohibits u.s. department of state and department of defense for military from police forces to engage. there's something essential to our mission at human rights first denies refugee protection. the c
's turning into a tory. can i test that theory? the immigration bill is being signed by 60 coalition mps calling for the transitional arrangements for bulgaria and romania to be continued. does he agree with that? >> mr. speaker, i'm glad he hasn't raised his morbid obsession with the earnings of the primus which i know is a subject of his private member's bill. and i want to thank in for his next double edge conflict just now. on the issue, as he knows the prime minister, myself, the whole government faces of announcements last week where we are tightening up the access to benefits for those that might come from the other parts of your opinion to this country. i believe we should protect and defend the principle of the freedom of movement but the freedom to move is not the same as the freedom to claim. that is a distinction which this government is now making. >> order. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons not as a move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired like wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern while parliament is
unified country with an undie vieded sir yea slow -- sarajevo as capital. trade and immigration, and each division -- the serbian republic and the bosnian and croatian republic -- would have their own police forces and, basically, run their domestic lives. then we had to sell it, including a peacekeeping force of 60,000, two-thirds of which would be supplied by 25 other countries, one-third by the united states. you heard them talk about that. as i remember, only about 60% of the people were opposed to us participating in that. i say that to make this point. the american people, particularly when they think not all is well at home, have their political leaders to act for them, but they know we have global responsibilities. often times when a proposed course of action is unpopular, it's not exactly like the voters are telling you not to do it, it's basically like a giant blinking yellow light. they're saying, for goodness sakes, be careful, tell us what our objectives are, tell us when it's going to be over, and tell us what it's going to cost. and you better be right. in other words, if y
of two immigrants who come from india. decades earlier. we lifed in a house in bedford, massachusetts a middle class family. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own having never held a job before. she faced going back to india, or going on welfare to support her two young children. in india, we would have been marked stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities would be limited. she made that tough choice. she stayed. we stayed. we were on welfare. we were on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to help pay for rent. but because of a series of events we were able to remain in bedford and i was able to go to the public schools. my mom eventually got at the job at the travel agent, and by the time i was 11, i'm proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. but i know i'm here also because a lot of people were -- expand opportunity. it's hard a little bit to share my story. but i know we live in cynic
think is not just special immigrant named. she remembered people. that's how she got her political power. she said why is things like, don't worry what people are thinking about you because they don't do it that often. or she would say, we would all have a better perspective on life if we knew that the number of people at our funeral would only depend on the weather. or, every politician should know that one day he or she will be replaced. her parents had originally had a homestead on lake coeur d'alene. her father go to help up there and ran a steamboat, mail route on lake coeur d'alene. they built their form, their dairy farm just about five miles north of here, and that's where she was born with four older brothers and two younger brothers. she was asked to the reporter for coeur d'alene press, straight out of high school, and she took some of the births and deaths at first. and then she went on and did almost everything for the press. she went from there to become an administrative assistant for the governor. she had been covering political things for the press, and covered the secon
look at age of individuals and may be involved in immigration and deportation issues. that phenotype is interesting and we are here today for forensics. this is a new little category on this chart. i've been using this lovely chart to teach for years and years and forensics has been added to the chart. in part it has been due in part to the popular culture, obviously loans and all the crime shows that have been on television but also current if ants and hearing about mass graves and the analysis of these remains that are coming from mass conflict have started to make their way into the public reception of the kind of work we do behind the scenes. so what is forensic anthropology you probably get a different definition from all forensic anthropologist because they haven't quite decided on what they are yet. it's a new subdisciplines within physical anthropology and they are trying to carve out a niche for themselves. folks that specialized in just dealing with medical and legal issues in contemporary events. so the folks at jpac and so are individuals that are worked in hawaii on the
a lot of money because my client thinks this is cool. [laughter] omlt's of immigran immigrant con believes nothing further is a good thing. frankly, almost every american delays not being the federal government. i've had very few people rush in and say i feel so bad. could i give them more? [laughter] so the second phase would be to i shall bring people who do it well. the third phase would be in a very calm way to bring in the people currently in charge and just say, explain the system. this is a system -- this is what i learned from taking a tutorial from the father of the call the movie. this is not about bad people. these are decent people in a terrible system. and so you have to say tell me what the system is. and then you ought to bring in experts who can say, all right, here is a system that works and here's a system that fails. if you want to get to the system that works it means you have to have these changes. i think what would be very helpful for the country at the last stage of these countries would be members talking among themselves in public and saying given what we
income neighborhoods or may potentially think about immigrant communities as well. how do you create services, create those services and then promote and communicate those services and a way that's linguistically and culturally relevant to these committees as well. >> one of the issues you been working on at national to get cities is the issue best races which is how the business licensing regulations get in the way and how do they constrain microenterprises? you been doing with the issue of food trucks. and you talk about the work you've been doing and maybe give us ideas of places, of cities where there's a lot of interesting work going on and you're making progress and maybe what some of the challenges have been? >> sure. i think you raise a lot of interesting points and i would agree with most of those. when we think about licensing, particularly at the city levels and permits, there's always a reason why a particular permit or license was there to begin with but over time as we said, unless you actually taken in the door, take stock, think about why those licenses and permits ar
immigration, integration of highly skilled individuals, corporate tax reform come overseas profits, international trade and simplifying the streamlined regulation for improving the communication and the infrastructure and the sustainable budget and responsible development of american gas and oil reserves as important component of competitiveness worldwide. first i wanted to ask a little bit about do you think that it's possible to develop these reserves responsibly, is that the epa position? >> i believe so. >> tell me a little bit about what you think the approach should be and i want to give you time because i don't feel like -- you get interrupted sometimes when you try to get these answers. what should be the approach to the development of this i would ask you to touch on two things in particular. one is obviously water and supply and quality that the emission of gas including methane which is a super public and and also how you would avoid the double regulation because i understand there's other agencies in the government who may be doing things that are overlapping. >> there'
constitutional design. from obamacare to immigration, the current administration is picking and choosing which laws to an oars. the constitution does not confer upon the president the executive authority to disregard the separations of powers by unilaterally waving, suspending or revising the laws. it is a bedrock principle of constitutional law that the program must be fully execute acts of congress. the president cannot refuse to enforce the law simply because he dislikes it. certainly, president have from time to time make broad claims of executive power. however, assertions of executive authority have been limited to the area in which presidential powers are at their strongest. foreign affairs. the obama administration go has been equally assertive in the realm of domestic policy, routinely making end runs around congress for broad claims of prosecutorial discretion and regulatory actions that bush executive power beyond all limits. indeed, president obama is the first president since richard nixon to ignore a duly enacted law, simply because he disagrees with it. and they said the checks
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32